Sun Current http://current.mnsun.com Local News for Bloomington, Eden Prairie, Edina and Richfield Minnesota Mon, 31 Aug 2015 19:53:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Buy or Rent a Home? http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/buy-or-rent-a-home/ http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/buy-or-rent-a-home/#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 18:52:55 +0000 http://current.mnsun.com/?guid=e914878cf3ed36b42ef7d3170174c97a Do you fork cash over to a landlord in exchange for freedom of responsibility for residential maintenance, or take out a mortgage and shell out monthly for the pride – and eventually financial payoff – of homeownership?  

A recent study from Zillow, the online real estate service, shows that homebuyers nationwide face more challenges this year, with inventory down 6.5% from 2014 and home values up 3.3% over roughly the same period.

While the market appears to be in the seller’s favor, many still opt to buy for stability, tax benefits or some other plus. As a financial planner, I often discuss real estate’s potential effect on a financial future.

There are plenty of reasons to buy and likewise plenty to support renting a home. Below are a few considerations.

Buying. A home provides a place to live – stability for you and your family. When you own a home, you are no longer at the mercy of a landlord who changes terms or, even worse, sells the property. With each mortgage payment you also know you’re closer to outright owning that asset.

Among other good points:

No surprises. While a leaky roof or broken water heater might catch you off guard, your monthly payment typically doesn’t vary. This helps with budgeting, cash flow and other aspects of a comprehensive financial plan.

Tax benefits. As a homeowner, you can deduct many related expenses. And unless you owe more than $1 million, all the interest in your mortgage payment is deductible.

Diversification. While real estate doesn’t always prove the best investment over a long time – often barely keeping up with inflation – it can serve as a great portfolio tool.

Just as you commonly invest in stocks, bonds, cash, certificates of deposit and the like through brokerage and retirement accounts, you can use real estate as another asset class that can help diversify your investing. Plus, as a tangible asset, real estate appeals to many other potential buyers and investors.

Equity building and retirement planning. As a homeowner, you build your equity through paying down your mortgage over the years. If successful, you will likely enjoy a lower cost of living in retirement.

Renting. If you’re part of the population that’s unable to buy at this time, you have a few good reasons to rent.

Flexibility. Maybe you prefer to move around, seeing new neighborhoods and cities; it’s hard to put a dollar value on that experience and enjoyment.

If you anticipate a career or job change renting might suit you better, as buying a home can hinder your flexibility to pick up and move.

Avoiding homeownership costs. Homeowners are painfully familiar with such extra, unforeseen and often hefty costs as Realtor fees, mortgage origination fees to start your loan, property taxes, moving costs, furnishing, decorating, leaky pipes, gardener wages – you name it. As a tenant, you enjoy the perks of your home without the worrisome financial burden.

Liquidity. Generally, you can’t turn a house into cash overnight. Many people invest a lifetime’s savings into a home, putting the bulk of their net worth into an illiquid asset. Risk comes with tying up a large portion of your wealth in such an asset. Renting allows you flexibility and other investment options.

Building credit. As consumers, we need a healthy credit for pretty much all we do, from getting a new cell phone plan to buying a car. While renting doesn’t boost your credit rating the same as owning a home, creating a history of on-time rental payments can, in some cases, help build your credit to qualify for a mortgage down the road.

This history begins when (and if) your landlord reports your payment data to credit agencies. Third-party services can help you report this information on your behalf.

Once your credit is solid, you can reevaluate if owning a home seems right for you.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Taylor Schulte, CFP, is founder and chief executive officer of Define Financial in San Diego, responsible for company’s vision, strategy and execution. He specializes in helping individuals, families and small business achieve their financial goals, from investment management, financial and retirement planning to charitable giving, college planning and insurance services. While he works with a wide range of clients, Schulte has a keen understanding of the millennial generation’s financial needs and a progressive, forward-thinking approach. Schulte was recently honored with the 2015 Five Star Wealth Manager Award, a recognition limited to fewer than one in 20 wealth managers in San Diego. He also regularly contributes to the San Diego Downtown News.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]>
Do you fork cash over to a landlord in exchange for freedom of responsibility for residential maintenance, or take out a mortgage and shell out monthly for the pride – and eventually financial payoff – of homeownership?  

A recent study from Zillow, the online real estate service, shows that homebuyers nationwide face more challenges this year, with inventory down 6.5% from 2014 and home values up 3.3% over roughly the same period.

While the market appears to be in the seller’s favor, many still opt to buy for stability, tax benefits or some other plus. As a financial planner, I often discuss real estate’s potential effect on a financial future.

There are plenty of reasons to buy and likewise plenty to support renting a home. Below are a few considerations.

Buying. A home provides a place to live – stability for you and your family. When you own a home, you are no longer at the mercy of a landlord who changes terms or, even worse, sells the property. With each mortgage payment you also know you’re closer to outright owning that asset.

Among other good points:

No surprises. While a leaky roof or broken water heater might catch you off guard, your monthly payment typically doesn’t vary. This helps with budgeting, cash flow and other aspects of a comprehensive financial plan.

Tax benefits. As a homeowner, you can deduct many related expenses. And unless you owe more than $1 million, all the interest in your mortgage payment is deductible.

Diversification. While real estate doesn’t always prove the best investment over a long time – often barely keeping up with inflation – it can serve as a great portfolio tool.

Just as you commonly invest in stocks, bonds, cash, certificates of deposit and the like through brokerage and retirement accounts, you can use real estate as another asset class that can help diversify your investing. Plus, as a tangible asset, real estate appeals to many other potential buyers and investors.

Equity building and retirement planning. As a homeowner, you build your equity through paying down your mortgage over the years. If successful, you will likely enjoy a lower cost of living in retirement.

Renting. If you’re part of the population that’s unable to buy at this time, you have a few good reasons to rent.

Flexibility. Maybe you prefer to move around, seeing new neighborhoods and cities; it’s hard to put a dollar value on that experience and enjoyment.

If you anticipate a career or job change renting might suit you better, as buying a home can hinder your flexibility to pick up and move.

Avoiding homeownership costs. Homeowners are painfully familiar with such extra, unforeseen and often hefty costs as Realtor fees, mortgage origination fees to start your loan, property taxes, moving costs, furnishing, decorating, leaky pipes, gardener wages – you name it. As a tenant, you enjoy the perks of your home without the worrisome financial burden.

Liquidity. Generally, you can’t turn a house into cash overnight. Many people invest a lifetime’s savings into a home, putting the bulk of their net worth into an illiquid asset. Risk comes with tying up a large portion of your wealth in such an asset. Renting allows you flexibility and other investment options.

Building credit. As consumers, we need a healthy credit for pretty much all we do, from getting a new cell phone plan to buying a car. While renting doesn’t boost your credit rating the same as owning a home, creating a history of on-time rental payments can, in some cases, help build your credit to qualify for a mortgage down the road.

This history begins when (and if) your landlord reports your payment data to credit agencies. Third-party services can help you report this information on your behalf.

Once your credit is solid, you can reevaluate if owning a home seems right for you.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Taylor Schulte, CFP, is founder and chief executive officer of Define Financial in San Diego, responsible for company’s vision, strategy and execution. He specializes in helping individuals, families and small business achieve their financial goals, from investment management, financial and retirement planning to charitable giving, college planning and insurance services. While he works with a wide range of clients, Schulte has a keen understanding of the millennial generation’s financial needs and a progressive, forward-thinking approach. Schulte was recently honored with the 2015 Five Star Wealth Manager Award, a recognition limited to fewer than one in 20 wealth managers in San Diego. He also regularly contributes to the San Diego Downtown News.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

  ]]> http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/buy-or-rent-a-home/feed/ 0 How to Stop Money Fights http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/how-to-stop-money-fights/ http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/how-to-stop-money-fights/#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 17:22:55 +0000 http://current.mnsun.com/?guid=e3123de98edc270c6cde37f087cec8e4 Trouble talking money with your honey? Do you just defer to your partner? Money remains a major reason couples split, and here’s how you can douse the arguments before they ignite.

As a financial planner, I know that staying in love and managing money over a lifetime can be tricky. As a wife, I’m also aware that financial intimacy didn’t come to my husband and me without a few bumps.

Couples who “disagree about finances once a week” are over 30% more likely to get divorced than couples that report “disagreeing about finances a few times a month,” according to a Utah State University study examining finances and divorce. 

Part of your job as a couple committed to staying together: Learn yours and your partner’s money psychology. Here are three steps to help you stop fighting about money.

Share your money past. Be honest and humble. Look into your financial habits to determine if they work the way you want. If not, do you really want to keep repeating behaviors that get such results?

What is your story about money? Sentenced yourself to a life of hardship and scarcity? What’s the money pain you don’t want to let go of, the financial thing you can’t leave in the past? What are you afraid of when it comes to you and money?

Now you can see the futility of your money attitudes producing bad results yet you still argue with your partner that you want to conduct financial affairs your way.

Work together to improve your financial wisdom. My husband likes to play the game of credit card points and rewards. I have a strong aversion to credit cards because of overspending in my past.

Don’t get me wrong, point programs can be valuable (as I learned). I still want only a couple of cards at any one time.

My husband, though, keeps 12 to 15 cards active simultaneously. He also maintains an excellent Fair Isaac Corp. (FICO) credit score of near 800 and pays the cards off every month.

Early in our marriage, when I figured out how many credit cards he carried, I was freaked out, floored and, honestly, frightened. I wanted him to cut some up.

I decided to look at it rationally. Because of my money history relative to his and because he manages all of those cards effectively, I just decided to trust him.

We paid for most of our wedding on those cards, and then we paid off the cards. You know what? We went to Hawaii for two weeks for free because of his credit card points.

Forgive your partner and yourself, and move on with a plan. Feel compassion for yourself and for your partner in this stage. This doesn’t mean excuse anyone of responsibility with money but simply acknowledge the power of previous behavior and programming.

(I teach people about their Money Operating Systems in my online course, Your Rich Retirement Academy and in my TEDx talk, “The Surprising Power of Language to Make You Rich.”)

In my case, my husband managed his finances on his own for 46 years before I met him. He isn’t naturally inclined to ask me before applying for another credit card.

We know now to take each other’s money languages in stride. I no longer accuse him of trying to keep me in the dark, and he tries to be more forthcoming.

It takes work for me to be that analytical about my own money, but it does bring us to the table together in financial partnership.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Hilary Hendershott, MBA, CFP, is founder and Chief Executive of Silicon Valley-based Hilary Hendershott Financial. The firm offers a suite of products and services including fee-only planning. She regularly writes about personal finance at HilaryHendershott.com. You can find her on Twitter @HilarytheCFP.

She also offers financial advice and coaching for women on an online personal finance training program, Your Rich Retirement Academy. 

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]> Trouble talking money with your honey? Do you just defer to your partner? Money remains a major reason couples split, and here’s how you can douse the arguments before they ignite.

As a financial planner, I know that staying in love and managing money over a lifetime can be tricky. As a wife, I’m also aware that financial intimacy didn’t come to my husband and me without a few bumps.

Couples who “disagree about finances once a week” are over 30% more likely to get divorced than couples that report “disagreeing about finances a few times a month,” according to a Utah State University study examining finances and divorce. 

Part of your job as a couple committed to staying together: Learn yours and your partner’s money psychology. Here are three steps to help you stop fighting about money.

Share your money past. Be honest and humble. Look into your financial habits to determine if they work the way you want. If not, do you really want to keep repeating behaviors that get such results?

What is your story about money? Sentenced yourself to a life of hardship and scarcity? What’s the money pain you don’t want to let go of, the financial thing you can’t leave in the past? What are you afraid of when it comes to you and money?

Now you can see the futility of your money attitudes producing bad results yet you still argue with your partner that you want to conduct financial affairs your way.

Work together to improve your financial wisdom. My husband likes to play the game of credit card points and rewards. I have a strong aversion to credit cards because of overspending in my past.

Don’t get me wrong, point programs can be valuable (as I learned). I still want only a couple of cards at any one time.

My husband, though, keeps 12 to 15 cards active simultaneously. He also maintains an excellent Fair Isaac Corp. (FICO) credit score of near 800 and pays the cards off every month.

Early in our marriage, when I figured out how many credit cards he carried, I was freaked out, floored and, honestly, frightened. I wanted him to cut some up.

I decided to look at it rationally. Because of my money history relative to his and because he manages all of those cards effectively, I just decided to trust him.

We paid for most of our wedding on those cards, and then we paid off the cards. You know what? We went to Hawaii for two weeks for free because of his credit card points.

Forgive your partner and yourself, and move on with a plan. Feel compassion for yourself and for your partner in this stage. This doesn’t mean excuse anyone of responsibility with money but simply acknowledge the power of previous behavior and programming.

(I teach people about their Money Operating Systems in my online course, Your Rich Retirement Academy and in my TEDx talk, “The Surprising Power of Language to Make You Rich.”)

In my case, my husband managed his finances on his own for 46 years before I met him. He isn’t naturally inclined to ask me before applying for another credit card.

We know now to take each other’s money languages in stride. I no longer accuse him of trying to keep me in the dark, and he tries to be more forthcoming.

It takes work for me to be that analytical about my own money, but it does bring us to the table together in financial partnership.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Hilary Hendershott, MBA, CFP, is founder and Chief Executive of Silicon Valley-based Hilary Hendershott Financial. The firm offers a suite of products and services including fee-only planning. She regularly writes about personal finance at HilaryHendershott.com. You can find her on Twitter @HilarytheCFP.

She also offers financial advice and coaching for women on an online personal finance training program, Your Rich Retirement Academy. 

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

  ]]> http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/how-to-stop-money-fights/feed/ 0 Edina High School in top 100 of Newsweek’s high school ranking http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/edina-high-school-in-top-100-of-newsweeks-high-school-ranking/ http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/edina-high-school-in-top-100-of-newsweeks-high-school-ranking/#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 13:00:00 +0000 http://current.mnsun.com/?p=151662 Newsweek magazine’s annual ranking of America’s Top High Schools has again placed Edina High School in the top 100 schools in the country. At 71st, EHS is the highest-ranked Minnesota high school and the only school in the state in the top 100.

The magazine’s list of 500 top high schools is based on academic performance and college-readiness of students.

The magazine uses its “college readiness index” to analyze schools’ performance. The index includes the following indicators: college enrollment rate, graduation rate, weighted AP/IB/dual enrollment composite scores, weighted SAT/ACT composite scores, student retention, and counselor-to-student ratio.

The consistently high ranking of EHS by Newsweek is the result of hard work by students and staff to prepare EHS graduates for post-secondary academic options, and for their lives personally and professionally, according to Bruce Locklear, EHS principal.

“Our mission as a school and as a district, is to prepare these young people for the next phase of their lives so that each one is fully capable of reaching their potential,” said Locklear. “The commitment of our teaching staff across the district, the rigor of our curriculum and the variety of learning opportunities we offer, allow our students to explore their passions and discover their strengths.”

While proud of this recent accolade, Supt. Ric Dressen also noted that the next generation of students will find new and different opportunities as future careers are developed to match the needs of a changing world, which means the education of that generation must also change.

“We are very proud to have our students and staff recognized by being named to these lists, but our work goes on,” said Dressen. “Our Next Generation Strategic Plan, including looking differently at learning programs and spaces, will help ensure that Edina students, now and in years to come, are ready for a future that is still emerging.”

Newsweek has been ranking the country’s high schools for more than a decade. ]]> http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/edina-high-school-in-top-100-of-newsweeks-high-school-ranking/feed/ 0 Stock Panic Mechanics http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/stock-panic-mechanics/ http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/stock-panic-mechanics/#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 12:52:57 +0000 http://current.mnsun.com/?guid=a07205cc855ef3d0db53cd1c17a39a06 The chief reason for last week’s market slide – down more than 10% from its high, which is commonly known as a correction – is computer-driven institutional selling. If those traders’ algorithms tell them to sell, because everyone else is, they join the crowd and sell.The big stock selloff we just suffered was in large part not fundamentally driven. While hardly buoyant, the U.S. economic recovery remains encouraging. Consumer confidence is at a seven-month high (101.5 in August), durable goods orders rose 2% in July from June and 4.1% in June from May.  Second quarter gross domestic product got revised up to 3.7% from 2.3%. 

True, there are weaknesses that legitimately troubled the market. The U.S. stock market has been flat this year, until August’s rout, primarily due to a lack of corporate revenue and earnings growth.  The headwinds of a strong dollar, weak oil and slowing China remain. 

As worries mounted about slowing growth in China, the world’s second largest economy, the Dow Jones Industrial Average opened down 1,000 points last Monday, Aug. 24. Then the Dow, Nasdaq and Standard & Poor’s 500 staged a late-week recovery that undid some of the damage.

The extreme high volume and price volatility had a lot to do with institutional algorithmic trading and corresponding market making activities.  For example, the CBOE Volatility Index (VIX) reached an intraday – meaning during the trading day, not at the market close – high of 53.29 this past Monday.  The only other period with a higher level was during the credit crisis in 2008-2009.

The VIX measures near-term put option buying on the S&P 500.  Investors who buy put options are concerned the market (or a stock) is going lower and may buy puts to hedge a position. A put option allows the investor to lock in a specific selling price for a specific time, so he knows he can bail out before prices slip lower.
 
Without a full review of options trading, buying and selling calls and puts are facilitated through market makers.  In the case of puts, market makers often hedge their naked put option positions – where they sell a put but don’t own the underlying stock – by selling short the S&P 500 index, a bet that it will fall. The shorting is supposed to let them raise cash to buy the shares they need to give the put buyer when he exercises his option. The mechanics of this process can create a vicious selling cycle, pushing down this broad-market benchmark.
 
On Monday, when put buying reached panic levels, options market makers placed a tremendous amount of selling pressure on the S&P 500 by selling short the index.  Additionally, investors bought volatility via various exchange-traded funds and notes – the iPath S&P 500 ST VIX Futures ETN (VXX), the Velocity Shares Daily 2x VIX ST ETN (TVIX) and the ProShares Ultra VIX Short-Term Futures (UVXY) – at all-time high volume last week. 

Short covering and unwinding of other institutional bearish investments partly drove the strong rebound in stock prices on Wednesday and Thursday . The rebound may gain strength as investors return to looking at economic factors and valuation levels.  For the price recovery to have legs, investors will need to see evidence of a resumption of earnings and revenue growth.
 
The key to managing through the volatility is to remain non-emotional.  If an investor has clearly defined rules for when to buy, what to buy and when to sell, over time they should achieve attractive returns. 

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Nicholas Atkeson and Andrew Houghton are the founding partners of Delta Investment Management, a registered investment advisory firm in San Francisco, and authors of the new book, Win by Not Losing: A Disciplined Approach To Building And Protecting Your Wealth In The Stock Market By Managing Your Risk. Additional market commentary and investment advice is available via their websites at www.deltaim.com and www.deltawealthaccelerator.com

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

]]> The chief reason for last week’s market slide – down more than 10% from its high, which is commonly known as a correction – is computer-driven institutional selling. If those traders’ algorithms tell them to sell, because everyone else is, they join the crowd and sell.The big stock selloff we just suffered was in large part not fundamentally driven. While hardly buoyant, the U.S. economic recovery remains encouraging. Consumer confidence is at a seven-month high (101.5 in August), durable goods orders rose 2% in July from June and 4.1% in June from May.  Second quarter gross domestic product got revised up to 3.7% from 2.3%. 

True, there are weaknesses that legitimately troubled the market. The U.S. stock market has been flat this year, until August’s rout, primarily due to a lack of corporate revenue and earnings growth.  The headwinds of a strong dollar, weak oil and slowing China remain. 

As worries mounted about slowing growth in China, the world’s second largest economy, the Dow Jones Industrial Average opened down 1,000 points last Monday, Aug. 24. Then the Dow, Nasdaq and Standard & Poor’s 500 staged a late-week recovery that undid some of the damage.

The extreme high volume and price volatility had a lot to do with institutional algorithmic trading and corresponding market making activities.  For example, the CBOE Volatility Index (VIX) reached an intraday – meaning during the trading day, not at the market close – high of 53.29 this past Monday.  The only other period with a higher level was during the credit crisis in 2008-2009.

The VIX measures near-term put option buying on the S&P 500.  Investors who buy put options are concerned the market (or a stock) is going lower and may buy puts to hedge a position. A put option allows the investor to lock in a specific selling price for a specific time, so he knows he can bail out before prices slip lower.
 
Without a full review of options trading, buying and selling calls and puts are facilitated through market makers.  In the case of puts, market makers often hedge their naked put option positions – where they sell a put but don’t own the underlying stock – by selling short the S&P 500 index, a bet that it will fall. The shorting is supposed to let them raise cash to buy the shares they need to give the put buyer when he exercises his option. The mechanics of this process can create a vicious selling cycle, pushing down this broad-market benchmark.
 
On Monday, when put buying reached panic levels, options market makers placed a tremendous amount of selling pressure on the S&P 500 by selling short the index.  Additionally, investors bought volatility via various exchange-traded funds and notes – the iPath S&P 500 ST VIX Futures ETN (VXX), the Velocity Shares Daily 2x VIX ST ETN (TVIX) and the ProShares Ultra VIX Short-Term Futures (UVXY) – at all-time high volume last week. 

Short covering and unwinding of other institutional bearish investments partly drove the strong rebound in stock prices on Wednesday and Thursday . The rebound may gain strength as investors return to looking at economic factors and valuation levels.  For the price recovery to have legs, investors will need to see evidence of a resumption of earnings and revenue growth.
 
The key to managing through the volatility is to remain non-emotional.  If an investor has clearly defined rules for when to buy, what to buy and when to sell, over time they should achieve attractive returns. 

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Nicholas Atkeson and Andrew Houghton are the founding partners of Delta Investment Management, a registered investment advisory firm in San Francisco, and authors of the new book, Win by Not Losing: A Disciplined Approach To Building And Protecting Your Wealth In The Stock Market By Managing Your Risk. Additional market commentary and investment advice is available via their websites at www.deltaim.com and www.deltawealthaccelerator.com

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily. ]]> http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/stock-panic-mechanics/feed/ 0 Canceled: Benefit concert to aid Beyond the Yellow Ribbon http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/benefit-concert-to-aid-beyond-the-yellow-ribbon/ http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/benefit-concert-to-aid-beyond-the-yellow-ribbon/#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 08:09:14 +0000 http://current.mnsun.com/?p=151631 Update on Aug. 31: The Southwest Twin Cities Beyond the Yellow Ribbon group announced that it has canceled the event. “We had reviewed a number of options the last couple of days and feel we had to make the very difficult decision to cancel this year and just start ramping up for a bigger event next year with time to get corporate sponsorships and proper promotion,” the group’s Facebook page said.

Three bands will perform at the Hopkins Center for the Arts Thursday, Sept. 3, in a concert that will benefit the Southwest Twin Cities Beyond the Yellow Ribbon group, a partnership between the cities of Edina, Hopkins, Minnetonka and St. Louis Park.

“This is a coalition that was formed two years ago to really provide ongoing support to families of ongoing deployed military and those at home,” Hopkins City Councilmember and group co-chair Jason Gadd told the Edina City Council during a meeting in August.

Like other Beyond the Yellow Ribbon certified cities, counties and groups, the southwest partners enlisted a host of private and public-entity resources to be on-call should the family of an active-duty military member or veteran need any assistance with daily life: car fixes, snow shoveling, transportation, legal help and any other need.

Several hundred volunteers have agreed to respond when needed, Edina City Councilmember Mary Brindle said in an interview. She assists the volunteer group as well.

“We just try to be there for whatever population shows itself and asks for help,” she said.

To become a certified Beyond the Yellow Ribbon organization, several requirements must be met that show committed support from the community. Those requirements must be updated each year in a report, Brindle said.

Residents can participate in the process, too. Anyone who would like to volunteer or knows of a veteran who may need assistance can contact the group through its website, www.swtcbeyondtheyellowribbon.org.

The Southwest Twin Cities Beyond the Yellow Ribbon is hosting a benefit concert at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 3, at the Hopkins Center for the Arts, 1111 Mainstreet, Hopkins.

The concert is meant to spread awareness about the group throughout the cities. It is also meant to raise money for both the Southwest coalition and for an educational scholarship through the nonprofit Folds of Honor Minnesota, which aids children of military veterans who have been killed or disabled.

The lineup includes Maiden Dixie, a country band that includes two military veterans, Tim Sigler who will perform country cover songs, and Beau Davidson, a Nashville recording artist.

To purchase tickets, call the box office at 952-979-1111, option 4 or visit bit.do/WeUnite. Tickets are also available at the Hopkins Center for the Arts box office.

Contact Paul Groessel at paul.groessel@ecm-inc.com or follow the Sun Current on Twitter @EdinaSunCurrent ]]> http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/benefit-concert-to-aid-beyond-the-yellow-ribbon/feed/ 0 Wood Lake Nature Center director reflects after on 24 years on the job http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/wood-lake-nature-center-director-reflects-after-on-24-years-on-the-job/ http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/wood-lake-nature-center-director-reflects-after-on-24-years-on-the-job/#comments Sun, 30 Aug 2015 17:49:30 +0000 http://current.mnsun.com/?p=151695 Karen Shragg, Wood Lake Nature Center manager

Karen Shragg, Wood Lake Nature Center manager

I walked in the door of Richfield’s Wood Lake Nature center 24 years ago. As I begin my 25th year as its manager, I am filled with so much gratitude. As much as I try to give to Wood Lake by teaching, by fundraising, by supervising improvements and protecting this unique landscape, it is a lopsided arrangement for I get back so much more.

Every day Wood Lake has a lesson for me to learn. It teaches me over and over again the value these 150 acres has to wildlife and people. I guess I am a slow learner. Nature will humble you in a hurry. In other worlds, humans get to dominate at least for a while. In nature, no matter how much we try, she puts us in our place with her latest challenge. We tackle invasive buckthorn trees with the latest new tools and hundreds of volunteers, and nature sends the newest invasive, garlic mustard, to take over the newly cleared forest. In nature’s defense, humans are usually to blame for the original problems, after all we thought purple loosestrife was a lovely garden plant to import to our gardens from Europe before it started taking over wetlands.

The rewards, however, far outweigh the challenges of maintaining infrastructure and biodiversity in the middle of a city. I would bet I get to see more satisfied ‘customers’ than most people do in their jobs. Every day I hear people say, “I love this place, I just saw an eagle,” or, “What would I do without Wood Lake?” Without prompting, they tell me how great it is to have nature next door.

Our frequent walkers and birdwatchers have become my friends over the years. The many interns and volunteers that have come through our doors are another great part of my job. Like a mother hen, I brag and say we “raised” some of them who have gone on to full-time jobs at zoos, museums and other nature centers. Our common thread is our passion for sharing the natural world with people of all ages. Being a naturalist is not for the weak of heart. You have to be able to do everything from rescuing an injured snapping turtle to skinning out a fresh road killed raccoon. The Adams Family could take a few lessons from us.

Wood Lake has inspired me during the last two and a half decades to get a doctorate on the topic of the benefits of nature centers, to write a book about grief due to the number of memorials we have and to write children’s books about nature.
Then there is the nature itself. I don’t have to do much but step out my door to witness bird migrations, laying eggs and wild turkeys dropping by for a corn snack. I am indebted to those who have come before me at Wood Lake, those who fought to create it back in the 60s, my professors, friends and mostly the community of Richfield who have embraced Wood Lake over the years. Their love is expressed by their membership in Friends of Wood Lake (FOWL), joining the FOWL fundraising board and just by frequenting our many weekly public programs. If you haven’t been over to Wood Lake for a while, come over to 67th and Lake Shore Drive in the amazing city of Richfield and take in our trails, new pavilion and exhibits. You owe yourself the kind of joy that we are so happy to provide.

Karen Shragg is the manager of Wood Lake Nature Center in Richfield. She can be reached at 612-861-9361 or KShragg@cityofrichfield.org. ]]> http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/wood-lake-nature-center-director-reflects-after-on-24-years-on-the-job/feed/ 0 Ovarian cancer walk-run Sept. 12 in Edina http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/ovarian-cancer-walk-run-sept-12-in-edina/ http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/ovarian-cancer-walk-run-sept-12-in-edina/#comments Sun, 30 Aug 2015 17:08:23 +0000 http://current.mnsun.com/?p=151650 The Minnesota Ovarian Cancer Alliance will mark its 16th year of strides against ovarian cancer at its annual HOM Teal Strides for Ovarian Cancer walk and run on Saturday, Sept. 12, at Rosland Park in Edina.

MOCA, a statewide nonprofit dedicated to funding ovarian cancer research, also provides support for those affected by the disease and spreads awareness about the symptoms.

HOM Teal Strides for Ovarian Cancer is one of the largest ovarian cancer fundraising events in the country, and this year, MOCA is predicting its best turnout yet. Teams ranging from 3 to 100+ people will join forces to fundraise to benefit MOCA’s research funding and programs.

More than 3,500 participants – survivors, family, friends and children – are expected to take part in the event.

This year MOCA is introducing several new incentives for major event fundraisers and team captains.

Day-of registration for HOM Teal Strides for Ovarian Cancer begins at 7:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 12, with the 5K run beginning at 9:15 a.m. and the 2K walk starting at 9:45 a.m.

Youth participants can also register for a 1K Kids Fun Run.

Registration fees through the morning of Sept. 12 are $35. Participants can register for the event at mnovarian.org. Each participant receives a Teal Strides T-shirt, and water and snacks will also be provided.

For additional information, go to mnovarian.org or call 612-822-0500. ]]> http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/ovarian-cancer-walk-run-sept-12-in-edina/feed/ 0 Square dance club offers introductory lessons http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/square-dance-club-offers-introductory-lessons/ http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/square-dance-club-offers-introductory-lessons/#comments Sun, 30 Aug 2015 16:37:40 +0000 http://current.mnsun.com/?p=151621 Spares & Pairs square dancing club will host introductory classes in Bloomington next month.

The classes are 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesdays, Sept. 2-16, at the Bloomington Knights of Columbus Hall, 1114 W. American Blvd.

The club is open to singles, couples and families.

Info: 612-825-7197 (Catherine) ]]> http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/square-dance-club-offers-introductory-lessons/feed/ 0 Musician to perform at Bloomington church http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/musician-to-perform-at-bloomington-church/ http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/musician-to-perform-at-bloomington-church/#comments Sun, 30 Aug 2015 15:47:14 +0000 http://current.mnsun.com/?p=151586 An ordained pastor and musician who grew up with learning disabilities will perform at a Bloomington church this week.

Songwriter David Michael Carillo interweaves hymns, worship songs and his own composition using a variety of musical styles on his guitar. He will perform 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 3, at Emmaus Free Lutheran Church, 8443 Second Ave. S.

Info: 952-884-4751 ]]> http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/musician-to-perform-at-bloomington-church/feed/ 0 Bloomington man charged with first-degree burglary http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/bloomington-man-charged-with-first-degree-burglary/ http://current.mnsun.com/2015/08/bloomington-man-charged-with-first-degree-burglary/#comments Sun, 30 Aug 2015 13:34:24 +0000 http://current.mnsun.com/?p=151615

A 22-year-old Bloomington man has been charged with one count of first-degree burglary, accused of attacking a woman in her Bloomington home.

Bloomington police officers arrested Christian Westergard during the early morning hours of Aug. 15 outside a residence on the 10100 block of First Avenue after a 29-year-old woman had reported that she was attacked by him in her home, according to Bloomington Deputy Chief Denis Otterness.

Officers responding to the call shortly before 3 a.m. were told that the suspect was attempting to break into a neighboring home after he had attacked the victim in her home. Officers arriving at the scene found the suspect in the neighborhood, wearing one shoe, according to the complaint filed in Hennepin County District Court. He was arrested without incident, Otterness noted.

The victim told police that she awoke to noises in her kitchen. Thinking it was her mother, who was not home at the time, the woman went to the kitchen and saw the suspect standing there. Westergard asked the victim about a man she didn’t know. Unsatisfied with her response, he began punching her, Otterness said.

The attack continued. Westergard is accused of pushing the victim into her bathroom, pushing her down into the bathtub and continuing to punch her, Otterness said.

The victim was able to free herself long enough to attempt to flee, but Westergard allegedly grabbed her by the hair and began to choke her from behind. He eventually pinned the woman on her stomach and attempted to choke her further, cutting off her air several times, according to Otterness.

Westergard told her, “If you don’t give me names, I’m going to kill you,” Otterness noted.

Westergard did leave, however, allowing the victim to call 911. Officers interviewing the victim noted that she had blood around her nose and mouth, swelling around her eyes, red marks around her neck, chest and back, and blood on her clothing, Otterness said.

A shoe found inside the victim’s residence matched the one shoe the suspect was wearing at the time of his arrest, according to the complaint.

An exterior window on the rear of the victim’s home had been broken, but the adjoining interior window was not broken. It was unclear how entry into the victim’s home had been made, Otterness noted.

If convicted Westergard faces up to 20 years in prison and a $35,000 fine.

Vehicle chase

A joyride in a stolen vehicle ended with a pursuit in Bloomington and the arrest of four people inside the vehicle.

The driver, a 20-year-old Moorhead, Minn., man was arrested Aug. 16, along with three passengers, a 19-year-old Fargo, N.D., man, an 18-year-old Moorhead man and a 16-year-old Moorhead boy, according to Otterness.

The vehicle, a black 2007 Chevy Tahoe, had been reported stolen in Hawley, Minn., between 8:30 p.m. Aug. 15 and 3 a.m. Aug. 16, Otterness said.

The vehicle theft may be connected to several burglaries in Hawley, a town of approximately 2,000 between Fargo and Detroit Lakes, Minn., according to Otterness.

The vehicle had been identified in the Twin Cities and was the subject of a pursuit on southbound I-494 in the west metro during the evening of Aug. 16. The pursuit was terminated due to safety concerns, and an alert was sent to area law enforcement agencies. A Bloomington officer spotted the vehicle as it traveled eastbound on I-494 near 12th Avenue, Otterness said.

The officer followed the vehicle as it exited for southbound Highway 77, and then exited for Old Shakopee Road in Bloomington. The vehicle rolled through the stop sign at the end of the exit ramp and the officer attempted to make a traffic stop as the vehicle traveled eastbound. The driver did not stop, however, and attempted to flee the pursuing officer, Otterness explained.

The officer attempted to end the pursuit by conducting a PIT maneuver, but failed to do so. The pursuit continued to 24th Avenue and headed northbound before the driver turned east onto American Boulevard. The officer then conducted a second PIT maneuver and was able to disable the vehicle, Otterness said.

The driver and the 16-year-old boy fled the vehicle on foot. The officer tried to shoot the 16-year-old with a Taser gun, but was unable to incapacitate him due to the boy’s loose clothing. The officer caught him on foot, however, and arrested him, Otterness noted.

Officers assisting at the scene set up a perimeter and tracked down the driver with a police K9. The man was found hiding under a semi trailer at 2501 American Blvd., where the dog bit him, Otterness said. The victim was treated at the scene by ambulance before being booked in the Bloomington jail, he noted.

The other two men in the vehicle were arrested without incident, Otterness said.

The pursuit reached speeds of 70 mph on residential roadways, as the driver ran several stoplights and stop signs, according to the complaint filed in Hennepin County District Court.

The driver was charged in custody Aug. 18 with one count of fleeing a police officer in a motor vehicle. If convicted he faces up to three years and one day in prison and a fine of up to $5,000.

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